Slowly, slowly

Went to do the final test-fit of the completed dashboard on Saturday & found the glovebox door would not close once the screws were in the trim beads and the hinges. There were several other fitment issues requiring use of the rasp, and the screws that would hold the hinge to the door were loose in their holes–a legacy of my stupidity in trying to pre-cut the door from the marine ply before gluing my finish pieces to the front of them.

That plywood inner door shifted just a bit and left a void in the wood right where the screws need to bite.

I had filled this previously with a very interesting and easy to use wood epoxy I picked up at the Despot. Great stuff where wood putty would go, though stains a bit lighter than the surrounding wood. But it’s not great for screws and such.

Out came the stuff I know works:

JB Weld holds screwsepoxyholes1filing JB2Also worked a bit on the right upper corner to get the door to close properly.

I also filed away some more of the glass where the bolts holding the center plate will go–as they can’t reach through my wood dash and the fiberglass.

Then I did my final test-fit.
final door testAdded a bit of shoelace to keep the door from hammering on the dash when it’s open–and to provide a handy shelf for the “Gentleman’s Emergency Kit” when it’s needed.glovebox stop cord holderglovebox door stay

Then I took it all back apart, sanded with 150 grit and 220, and went on to the stain.prestainstainThe inside of the glovebox even has a flame to it.
glovebox int stainedThe back got this merlot stain–I want a contrast when the door is open.
backside red stainThat’s gonna get another coat to darken it so it’s closer to the exterior color.

The wet look of the natural stain on the front of the dash gives a preview of how the thing will look finished. The flame in this wood is just stunning. Pics–especially these, which were taken dry–do it no justice.
dash stainedNext: making it weather-proof.

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About stuntmidget

I'm a poor mechanic and general wisenheimer. I love old cars and the stories behind them, true or not.
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